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  • Joel S. Schuman
    Correspondence
    Correspondence: Joel S. Schuman, MD, New York University, Ophthalmology, New York, NY.
    Affiliations
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Brooklyn, New York
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  • Hiroshi Ishikawa
    Affiliations
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York

    UPMC Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Gadi Wollstein
    Affiliations
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York

    UPMC Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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      We thank Drs. Ye and Liang for their insightful comments regarding our study.
      • Kostanyan T.
      • Sung K.R.
      • Schuman J.S.
      • et al.
      Glaucoma structural and functional progression in American and Korean cohorts.
      In this study, we tested our hypothesis that “the composition of the participating populations in longitudinal glaucoma studies has a significant effect on the rate of structural and functional progression.” We attempted to highlight the potential problem of comparing glaucoma progression rate from studies performed on discrete populations. To this end, we used 2 distinctive cohorts with similar baseline characteristics and used conventional progression analysis methods. We demonstrated that ethnicity, baseline disease severity, disease subtype, and clinical diagnosis can significantly impact the rate of progression and therefore should be considered when comparing glaucoma progression studies. Our goal was not to create the standard of reference for rate of progression in certain ethnicities, disease severities, and so on, but rather to emphasize the need to account for the complex relationship between fundamental population characteristics when comparing progression rate results reported in the literature. Further studies are warranted to determine the naturalized rate of progression in different clinical settings.
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      Reference

        • Kostanyan T.
        • Sung K.R.
        • Schuman J.S.
        • et al.
        Glaucoma structural and functional progression in American and Korean cohorts.
        Ophthalmology. 2016; 123: 783-788

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