Author reply

      We appreciate the opportunity to discuss the recent report on innovative draping methods to minimize elevated oxygen concentrations in ophthalmic surgical fields.
      • Tao J.P.
      • Hirabayashi K.E.
      • Kim B.T.
      • et al.
      The efficacy of a midfacial seal drape in reducing oculofacial surgical field fire risk.
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      References

        • Tao J.P.
        • Hirabayashi K.E.
        • Kim B.T.
        • et al.
        The efficacy of a midfacial seal drape in reducing oculofacial surgical field fire risk.
        Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg. 2013; 29: 109-112
        • Orhan-Sungur M.
        • Komatsu R.
        • Sherman A.
        • et al.
        Effect of nasal cannula oxygen administration on oxygen concentration at facial and adjacent landmarks.
        Anaesthesia. 2009; 64: 521-526
        • Huddleston S.
        • Hamadani S.
        • Phillips M.E.
        • Fleming J.C.
        Fire risk during ophthalmic plastic surgery.
        Ophthalmology. 2013; 120 (1309-9)

      Linked Article

      • Fire Risk with Nasal Cannula Oxygen
        OphthalmologyVol. 120Issue 12
        • In Brief
          Huddleston et al1 raise awareness of fire hazards with supplemental oxygen during ophthalmic plastic surgery and succinctly outline the variables that contribute to devastating operating room fires. We question the conclusion that “insisting on nasal cannula use should be our next step toward eliminating surgical fires.”
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